Wayne State College
Menu
Act Now

Michael Jacobsen '07 Selected for Annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Event

Published Thursday, March 17th, 2011

Michael Jacobsen, a 2007 graduate of Wayne State College, was selected to attend the annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings from June 26 to July 1 in Lindau, Germany.

Michael Jacobsen, a 2007 graduate of Wayne State College, was selected to attend the annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings from June 26 to July 1, 2011, in Lindau, Germany. About 20 Nobel Laureates in physiology or medicine and 550 "Best Talent" young researchers from around the world met at Lindau to exchange ideas, discuss projects and build international networks. Young researchers are nominated by a global network of academic partners and then evaluated by a review panel.

Michael Jacobsen completed three majors at Wayne State: chemistry, biology, and computer science. He served on the student senate during his senior year at WSC (2006-07) and as the Nebraska State College System Board of Trustees representative in the same year. Jacobsen of Laurel, Neb., was one of only 323 students nationally and one of three Nebraska students to receive a Barry Goldwater Scholarship in 2006. A Neihardt Scholar and Honors Program student while at Wayne State, Jacobsen is now attending graduate school at the University of Utah conducting research on drug delivery systems.

The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings provide a globally recognized forum for the transfer of knowledge between generations of scientists. They inspire and motivate Nobel Laureates and international best talents. Lectures by the Nobel Laureates reflect current scientific topics and present relevant fields of research of the future. In panel discussions, seminars and during the various events of the social program, young researchers nominated by a worldwide network of Academic Partners interact with Nobel Laureates.

The scientific program, spread over several days, comprises interdisciplinary platform discussions, lectures presented by the Laureates and seminar talks. It reflects current scientific topics and deals with developments covering different fields; it addresses questions relating to basic research and application-orientated themes. The social program forms an integral element of the program concept of the Nobel Laureate Meetings. It is designed to provide as many opportunities for personal interaction as possible: Get-together evenings, jointly attended dinners, as well as the boat trip to the Isle of Mainau; all these activities offer excellent opportunities for intensive discussion between the Laureates and "Best Talents." Young researchers from more than 60 countries attend any one meeting.

Michael Jacobsen, a 2007 graduate of Wayne State College, has been selected to attend the annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings from June 26 to July 1 in Lindau, Germany. About 20 Nobel Laureates in physiology or medicine and 550 "Best Talent" young researchers from around the world will meet at Lindau to exchange ideas, discuss projects and build international networks. Young researchers are nominated by a global network of academic partners and then evaluated by a review panel.

Michael Jacobsen completed three majors at Wayne State: chemistry, biology, and computer science. He served on the student senate during his senior year at WSC (2006-07) and as the Nebraska State College System Board of Trustees representative in the same year. Jacobsen of Laurel, Neb., was one of only 323 students nationally and one of three Nebraska students to receive a Barry Goldwater Scholarship in 2006. A Neihardt Scholar and Honors Program student while at Wayne State, Jacobsen is now attending graduate school at the University of Utah conducting research on drug delivery systems.

The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings provide a globally recognized forum for the transfer of knowledge between generations of scientists. They inspire and motivate Nobel Laureates and international best talents. Lectures by the Nobel Laureates reflect current scientific topics and present relevant fields of research of the future. In panel discussions, seminars and during the various events of the social program, young researchers nominated by a worldwide network of Academic Partners interact with Nobel Laureates.

The scientific program, spread over several days, comprises interdisciplinary platform discussions, lectures presented by the Laureates and seminar talks. It reflects current scientific topics and deals with developments covering different fields; it addresses questions relating to basic research and application-orientated themes. The social program forms an integral element of the program concept of the Nobel Laureate Meetings. It is designed to provide as many opportunities for personal interaction as possible: Get-together evenings, jointly attended dinners, as well as the boat trip to the Isle of Mainau; all these activities offer excellent opportunities for intensive discussion between the Laureates and "Best Talents". Young researchers from more than 60 countries attend any one meeting. - See more at: https://www.wsc.edu/newscenter/story_archives/stories.php?iid=1214#sthash.bSfhOScc.dpuf
Michael Jacobsen, a 2007 graduate of Wayne State College, has been selected to attend the annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings from June 26 to July 1 in Lindau, Germany. About 20 Nobel Laureates in physiology or medicine and 550 "Best Talent" young researchers from around the world will meet at Lindau to exchange ideas, discuss projects and build international networks. Young researchers are nominated by a global network of academic partners and then evaluated by a review panel.

Michael Jacobsen completed three majors at Wayne State: chemistry, biology, and computer science. He served on the student senate during his senior year at WSC (2006-07) and as the Nebraska State College System Board of Trustees representative in the same year. Jacobsen of Laurel, Neb., was one of only 323 students nationally and one of three Nebraska students to receive a Barry Goldwater Scholarship in 2006. A Neihardt Scholar and Honors Program student while at Wayne State, Jacobsen is now attending graduate school at the University of Utah conducting research on drug delivery systems.

The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings provide a globally recognized forum for the transfer of knowledge between generations of scientists. They inspire and motivate Nobel Laureates and international best talents. Lectures by the Nobel Laureates reflect current scientific topics and present relevant fields of research of the future. In panel discussions, seminars and during the various events of the social program, young researchers nominated by a worldwide network of Academic Partners interact with Nobel Laureates.

The scientific program, spread over several days, comprises interdisciplinary platform discussions, lectures presented by the Laureates and seminar talks. It reflects current scientific topics and deals with developments covering different fields; it addresses questions relating to basic research and application-orientated themes. The social program forms an integral element of the program concept of the Nobel Laureate Meetings. It is designed to provide as many opportunities for personal interaction as possible: Get-together evenings, jointly attended dinners, as well as the boat trip to the Isle of Mainau; all these activities offer excellent opportunities for intensive discussion between the Laureates and "Best Talents". Young researchers from more than 60 countries attend any one meeting. - See more at: https://www.wsc.edu/newscenter/story_archives/stories.php?iid=1214#sthash.bSfhOScc.dpuf
Michael Jacobsen, a 2007 graduate of Wayne State College, has been selected to attend the annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings from June 26 to July 1 in Lindau, Germany. About 20 Nobel Laureates in physiology or medicine and 550 "Best Talent" young researchers from around the world will meet at Lindau to exchange ideas, discuss projects and build international networks. Young researchers are nominated by a global network of academic partners and then evaluated by a review panel.

Michael Jacobsen completed three majors at Wayne State: chemistry, biology, and computer science. He served on the student senate during his senior year at WSC (2006-07) and as the Nebraska State College System Board of Trustees representative in the same year. Jacobsen of Laurel, Neb., was one of only 323 students nationally and one of three Nebraska students to receive a Barry Goldwater Scholarship in 2006. A Neihardt Scholar and Honors Program student while at Wayne State, Jacobsen is now attending graduate school at the University of Utah conducting research on drug delivery systems.

The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings provide a globally recognized forum for the transfer of knowledge between generations of scientists. They inspire and motivate Nobel Laureates and international best talents. Lectures by the Nobel Laureates reflect current scientific topics and present relevant fields of research of the future. In panel discussions, seminars and during the various events of the social program, young researchers nominated by a worldwide network of Academic Partners interact with Nobel Laureates.

The scientific program, spread over several days, comprises interdisciplinary platform discussions, lectures presented by the Laureates and seminar talks. It reflects current scientific topics and deals with developments covering different fields; it addresses questions relating to basic research and application-orientated themes. The social program forms an integral element of the program concept of the Nobel Laureate Meetings. It is designed to provide as many opportunities for personal interaction as possible: Get-together evenings, jointly attended dinners, as well as the boat trip to the Isle of Mainau; all these activities offer excellent opportunities for intensive discussion between the Laureates and "Best Talents". Young researchers from more than 60 countries attend any one meeting. - See more at: https://www.wsc.edu/newscenter/story_archives/stories.php?iid=1214#sthash.bSfhOScc.dpuf